students guide to using the web   

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      casahistoria - web site for students of modern history!







  on this page
 
 
 
Browse down the page or just click one of these sections.... 
 
 
1. Find your information
2. Tools for the job
      Useful (free!) programmes to help you use the
      web for your research.
3. Is the site worthwhile?
      How to evaluate a site you have found.
4. Understanding the evidence
      How to get the most from your hours at the
      computer!
5. Cite your web research
      How to quote that strange site you googled...  
6. Finally:  How to keep on the right side of the
      law! Plagiarism & copyright
 
 
 
 
 















 

see what we are reading! 


casahistoria is recommended by many sites including:
   


 

 

 

1. Find your information                           
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2.Tools for the job:
      useful (free!) programmes to help you use the web for research


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The following are really useful tools to help you. Provided by the Center for History and New Media and George Mason University's Technology Across the Curriculum program. (requires you to register - doesn't take long!!)



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3. Is the site worthwhile? How to evaluate a site you have found

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  • Evaluating Web Sites: Criteria and Tools Basic guide for students and other users of the web to analyze the usefulness and reliability of sites. Includes links to examples of sites in order to illustrate ways to distinguish scholarly journals and sites from other types. Useful for students needing elementary guidance for using the web to help with assignments. And what would it say about casahistoria? by Michael Engle, Reference Division, Olin Kroch Uris Libraries, Cornell University.
  • Evaluating Web Pages: Experience WHY It's Important I like this one. Not the most exciting to look at but it has all the clues indicated to sift out the questionable from the useful: provides guidelines (including a thorough explanation of seven important areas to evaluate, from url, author, and institutional affiliation to overall authenticity, integrity, and bias., questions, and exercises for learning to evaluate material found on the Internet.) Teaching Library Internet Workshops, University of California, Berkeley.
  • Evaluation Criteria As above but simpler and set out as a checklist... by Susan E. Beck, Collection Development Coordinator, New Mexico State University Library
  • Evaluating Internet Information Presents websites in a textual context, comparing web with the printed word. Discusses the criteria by which scholars evaluate print information and shows how the same criteria can be applied to information found on the Internet. By Elizabeth Kirk, Librarian, Johns Hopkins University.



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4. Understanding the evidence:
    how to get the most from your hours at the computer!

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Making Sense of Documents: Designed for high school and college teachers and students by the History Matters site. These provide strategies for analyzing online primary materials, with interactive exercises and a guide to traditional and online sources.
  • Making Sense of Oral History Written by Linda Shopes, this guide presents an overview of oral history and ways historians use it
  • Making Sense of Films Written by Tom Gunning, this guide offers an overview of early twentieth-century film.
  • Making Sense of Maps Offers an overview of the history of maps and how historians use them, a breakdown of the elements of a map, tips on what questions to ask.
  • Making Sense of Numbers Written by Gary J. Kornblith, this guide offers an overview of quantitative methods, how historians use historical data
  • Making Sense of Letters and Diaries This guide offers an overview of letters and diaries as historical sources and how historians use them, tips on what questions to ask when reading them.
  • Making Sense of Advertisements This guide, written by Daniel Pope, offers an overview of advertisements as historical sources and how historians use them. Includes a brief history.
  • Making Sense of Documentary Photography In this guide, James Curtis helps students and teachers understand the documentary images that often illustrate textbooks
From the same site, help with analysis from historians:

 

 


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5. Cite your web research:
     how to quote that strange site you found on Google...

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  • How to Cite Electronic Sources Very useful as it shows how to cite by using clear visual examples. A US Library of Congress Web site.
  • Basic Columbia Guide to Online Style (2nd Ed) By Janice Walker, University of South Florida, and Todd Taylor, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. This is the official pdf of key samples from the book. It offers guidelines (from the book) for citing electronic sources. It describes the necessary primary elements for electronic citations as well as some strategies for dealing with the often incomplete nature of electronic sources. Specific examples explain the finer points of citing various formats, including: websites; email, discussion lists, and newsgroups; information retrieved through gopher, FTP, or telnet protocols; synchronous communication sites; online reference sources; electronic publications and databases; software programs; and even video games.
  • Citing Electronic Information in History Papers Rather dry but has many examples of how to cite what you have found on the web. By Maurice Crouse, Professor of History, University of Memphis.
and more for the perfectionist on online style.....








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6. And now, ....how to keep on the right side of the law

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Plagiarism Copyright
  • Internet Archives and Copyright I.Trotter Hardy, Law Professor, William and Mary School of Law, Williamsburg, VA. A basic essay that provides an overview of copyright law,  Emphasis is on traditional copyright issues rather than Internet (although New Media is included, but offers a clear, readable introduction to copyright.
  • Copyright Crash Course Georgia Harper, General Counsel, University of Texas. This user-friendly, approachable site offers a crash course in copyright law and its implications. The crash course tutorial was designed to help faculty "learn Copyright basics, especially in the distance learning context," and includes a test to assess copyright knowledge. Harper covers fair use and ownership specifics as well as details on creating multimedia, copyright in the digital library, copyright management, licensing resources, and online presentations.







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and finally: fed up looking at this screen? Try a book instead!


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Use casahistoria's list of recommended reads to curl up with ...

These have all been read and are recommended by casahistoria







For a longer(!) list including several novels & fuller crits/descriptions go tosee what we are reading!




casahistoria home                            visit caféhistoria for updates and current topic newsClick me and go to the café!




  v09.09



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